The Loneliest Polar Bear | Chapter 1

Kale Williams
PUBLISHED BY: The Oregonian ON October 16, 2017
AAAS Kavli Award

In the den, the walls were white like ice. Light came from a single red bulb. The air smelled of cool concrete, of straw piled thick, and of a heavy, captive musk. Somewhere, tucked under her 600-pound mother, was Nora. …

Read More

Storygram: Annie Waldman’s “How Hospitals Are Failing Black Mothers”

Annie Waldman • March 19, 2019
PUBLISHED BY: ProPublica ON December 27, 2017
National Academies Keck Award

A ProPublica analysis shows that women who deliver at hospitals that disproportionately serve black mothers are at a higher risk of harm.

Read More

Laser maps reveal slide risk with startling clarity, but few citizens know they exist

Sandi Doughton
PUBLISHED BY: The Seattle Times ON March 27, 2014
American Geophysical Union

An aerial scanning technique called lidar produces images that strip away vegetation to expose the landforms below. Some counties use them to ID hazardous areas, but others don’t.

Read More

The Ultimate Sacrifice

Ann Gibbons
PUBLISHED BY: Science Magazine ON May 18, 2012
National Academies Keck Award

Seeking to impress both gods and humans, early state societies across the globe displayed their power by ritually killing human victims

Read More

Where Forests Work Harder

Courtney Humphries
PUBLISHED BY: CITYLAB ON December 19, 2016
American Geophysical Union

A new study shows that trees in the Boston region grow faster and store more carbon as biomass the closer they are to developed areas.

Read More

Storygram: Joshua Sokol’s “Something in the water: life after mercury poisoning”

Joshua Sokol • December 4, 2018
PUBLISHED BY: Mosaic ON September 25, 2017
CASW ClarkPayne

Walking by the side of her house, Rimiko Yoshinaga points at the broad, vine-encrusted tree her grandfather used to climb. During one of the most famous environmental disasters in history, this tree stood over the calm, clear waters of the Shiranui Sea. He would perch up there and call down to say whether the fish were coming, Rimiko says. …

Read More

Inside the Firestorm

Douglas Fox
PUBLISHED BY: High Country News ON April 3, 2017
AAAS Kavli Award

Douglas Fox’s story, on new technology that allows scientists to see the forces behind the flames, won the AAAS Kavli award in 2017. Fox is a freelance journalist who writes extensively on earth, Antarctic, and polar sciences. Aircraft N2UW has flown […]

Read More

Lowcountry on the Edge

Tony Bartelme
PUBLISHED BY: The Post and Courier ON December 19, 2016
American Geophysical Union

Living on the edge has always been risky. Now our blurry edges are beginning to vanish.

Read More

Storygram: Maria Konnikova’s “Altered Tastes”

Maria Konnikova • October 23, 2018
PUBLISHED BY: The New Republic ON February 15, 2016
The Best American Science and Nature Writing

The light in the room softly brightened and grew warmer, yellower, somehow more embracing. …

Read More

Storygram: Nicola Twilley’s “How the First Gravitational Waves Were Found”

Nicola Twilley • September 11, 2018
PUBLISHED BY: The New Yorker ON February 11, 2016
The Best American Science and Nature Writing

Just over a billion years ago, many millions of galaxies from here, a pair of black holes collided. They had been circling each other for aeons in a sort of mating dance, gathering pace with each orbit, hurtling closer and closer. …

Read More

Read More Stories