Category: Medicine

Storygram: Antonio Regalado’s “Exclusive: Chinese Scientists Are Creating CRISPR Babies”

Antonio Regalado • June 25, 2019
PUBLISHED BY: MIT Technology Review ON November 25, 2018
Not Applicable

When Chinese researchers first edited the genes of a human embryo in a lab dish in 2015, it sparked global outcry and pleas from scientists not to make a baby using the technology, at least for the present. …

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Storygram: Marilynn Marchione’s “Chinese researcher claims first gene-edited babies”

Marilynn Marchione • June 25, 2019
PUBLISHED BY: Associated Press ON November 26, 2018
Not Applicable

HONG KONG (AP) — A Chinese researcher claims that he helped make the world’s first genetically edited babies — twin girls born this month whose DNA he said he altered with a powerful new tool capable of rewriting the very blueprint of life. …

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CRISPR Storygrams

Antonio Regalado, Marilynn Marchione
PUBLISHED BY: MIT Technology Review and Associated Press ON November 1, 2018
Not Applicable

The Storygram series, in which professional writers annotate award-winning stories to illuminate what makes a great science story great, is a joint project of The Open Notebook and the Council for the Advancement of Science Writing. It is supported by a grant from the Gordon and Betty […]

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Alive Inside

Mike Hixenbaugh
PUBLISHED BY: The Houston Chronicle ON December 3, 2017
AAAS Kavli Award

Danielle McNicoll wheeled her fiancé into his hospital room after physical therapy, then turned his power chair to face a mirror and ran her fingers through his hair. He never would have let it get this long, she thought. …

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Storygram: Annie Waldman’s “How Hospitals Are Failing Black Mothers”

Annie Waldman • March 19, 2019
PUBLISHED BY: ProPublica ON December 27, 2017
National Academies Keck Award

A ProPublica analysis shows that women who deliver at hospitals that disproportionately serve black mothers are at a higher risk of harm.

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Never Say Die

Megan Scudellari
PUBLISHED BY: Medium ON May 7, 2014
CASW ClarkPayne

NIR BARZILAI IS 57 YEARS OLD. There are wrinkles at the corners of his eyes, and his hair is turning grey. As the director of the Institute for Aging Research at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, Barzilai is more interested than most of us in the process of getting older. He studies ‘super-agers’, people between the ages of 95 and 112 who have never experienced any of the four most common diseases of aging: heart disease, diabetes, cancer and cognitive decline. …

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Storygram: Sarah Wild’s “Bones specialists try to prise secrets from the veld bodies”

Sarah Wild • March 20, 2018
PUBLISHED BY: Mail & Guardian ON January 20, 2017
AAAS Kavli Award

If it wasn’t for the smell, no one would know there was a body there. The savannah grass reaches above the waists of passers-by sweating under the Gauteng summer sun. …

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Gene Drive Gives Scientists Power to Hijack Evolution

Sharon Begley
PUBLISHED BY: STAT ON November 17, 2015
CASW Cohn Prize

As soon as Harvard biologist Kevin Esvelt began reading the scientific paper, he had a desperate question: Who are these guys?

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Storygram: Amy Maxmen’s “How the Fight Against Ebola Tested a Culture’s Traditions”

Amy Maxmen • October 3, 2017
PUBLISHED BY: National Geographic ON January 30, 2015
NASW Science in Society Award

A great quarrel followed the death of a pregnant Guinean woman in June …

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Storygram: Charles Piller’s “Failure to Report”

Charles Piller • March 21, 2017
PUBLISHED BY: STAT ON December 13, 2015
AAAS Kavli Award

Stanford University, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, and other prestigious medical research institutions have flagrantly violated a federal law requiring public reporting of study results, depriving patients and doctors of complete data to gauge the safety and benefits of treatments, a STAT investigation has found. …

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